The Bottle Boys: They Play Your Favorite Songs – on Bottles [Kicking Back with Jersey Joe] Mar29

The Bottle Boys: They Play Your Favorite Songs – on Bottles [Kicking Back with Jersey Joe]...

Direct from Denmark to you! The Bottle Boys are taking the hottest songs and performing them their way – with only bottles as musical instruments. The results are some striking tunes that you simply must hear! The five performers from Copenhagen, Denmark, each use a different type of bottle and style to produce a particular musical sound. Christopher Bogár – Chords Philipp Brodersen – Melody Johannes Ettrup – Melody Kaspar Frederiksen – Bass Martin B. Handberg – Percussion Some of the bottles are filled with water and played as pipes to give a piano/keyboard effect while others are simply plastic that you would recycle at home that gets hit for a  percussion beat. The Bottle Boys have become a hit around the globe, with a growing fan base in the United States, thanks to their performances on Youtube. Their videos have hundreds of thousands of views. The more people that subscribe to their channel, the more performances they promise to upload. Their songs range from Top 40 to movie themes and are often staged out in public on city streets. They have toured around the globe, including a few stops in the US. They first began uploading their videos to Youtube in 2007. THE 411 Name: The Bottle Boys What: musical group Location: Denmark Website: http://thebottleboys.com/ Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/bottlesonly Twitter feed: @TheBottleBoys JERSEY JOE RECOMMENDS: They’ve uploaded a bunch of performance videos on Youtube and I first found them as a Youtube suggestion on the home page.  Take a listen – it’s really worth it. Hopefully, these guys will be making some more stops in the United States, soon.  I would love to see them in New York City or Las Vegas!  Their performances remind me of a more local or real Blue Man Group minus the flash. If...

Book Week: Psy Comm, and interview with the Author [Gamer by Design] [Book Week II]...

My regular readers know, I write about video game design, business, and sometimes the mobile app scene. For Book Week, I decided to read something equally nerdy. That would be the graphic novel Psy-Comm. I have the privilege of knowing the author, Tony Salvaggio. As you’ll see below, he is one of those mad scientist personalities. He is a member of two bands, an author, a video game artist, and if there is any time left, I’m sure he eats and sleeps like the rest of us. So its been one of my blogging goals to score an interview. As for Psy-Comm, this thing is a 188 page graphic novel. But it moves really fast. I think I read the whole thing in about 1.5 hours. Part of that is the quick plot movement, but part of it is that it’s drawn in a very cinematic style. The frames are large and action oriented, with some pages only having about one sentence of text. The experience is more like watching a movie sometimes. Here’s my quick summary, without spoilers. The Psy-Comms are a group of psychic troopers, who each have really unique powers. I’d say it’s like the Matrix meets Harry Potter meets X-Men. But there is an interesting socio-political commentary, in which war is entertainment, and the media is woven into the whole battlefield environment. Somehow, with all this grand fare, the book also has a really tight interpersonal story that deals with young people coping with the loss of their loved ones in wartime. I’m honestly very surprised this isn’t a movie.  I’d see it. To be honest, I’m not a big graphic novel fan, but this one grabbed me. So here we go, the interview with author Tony Salvaggio: Matt: Psy-Comm could...

Fight the Slump [Dork Lifestyle]

I work as an artist and graphic designer as my day job. In my spare time I also like to be creative by running my handmade business, cooking, gardening, and fixing up our home. Is there such a thing as creative overload? Too many projects? Not enough time? Sometimes I feel overwhelmed by this and get overwhelmed and sad. Is it just me? How does one...

If Music be the Food, Play On [Elbows on the Table]

Food and music are two of the few things in the world that are universal. Sure some people don’t like peanut butter and some people don’t like polka. There is no person in the world who does not like music or does not like food. Both can evoke more than what they are. When you hear a favorite song, you think of that road trip you took when you were twenty one. When you eat tomato soup and grilled cheese you remember the snowy days you spent sledding when you were eight. Levon Helm, drummer for The Band, died last week. When I heard the news my thoughts inevitably turned to old family Thanksgivings. I think for most people, Thanksgiving is filled with WASPy simmering and unspoken frustrations, touch football and trying desperately to come up with something for which you are thankful before it is your turn to speak up before you can dig into your stuffing. Like most festivities in my house, Thanksgiving was barely civilized. I am the middle daughter of six intense and active children of two very passionate hippie parents. The one constant we had in holiday was The Last Waltz played on loop. Martin Scorsese filmed the last concert The Band performed on Thanksgiving in San Francisco. The Band wished everyone a happy Thanksgiving before performing for the last time with some of the eras most brilliant musicians, everyone from Bob Dylan to The Staple Singers. Even last Thanksgiving, which I spent in Paris, did not pass without me playing “The Weight” half a dozen times in my Saint Germaine hotel room. I didn’t need the turkey, but I did need The Band and the happy memories it evoked. Musicians and the culinary laborer have always shared a...

Movie Night, Sharing the Familiar [Secret Life of an Expat]

Last night I forced M to watch Stand by Me. I say forced because, it was already 10 pm, and we’d just watched Pirates of the Caribbean, At World’s End, full of squid-faced special effects and swashbucklery. But after that I wanted something, I don’t know, familiar? If I had been in the states, I would have been happy to turn on the TV and sit through a rerun of Law and Order, but in France, I went to my pile of DVDs from the library. Knowing nothing about the film but what he read on the DVD jacket (1959, four boys go on a camping trip to find a dead body in the woods), M wrinkled his nose and said “Okay, but don’t be mad if I fall asleep.” I said we only had to watch half of it, I was just craving something familiar. Stand by Me, directed by Rob Reiner, tells the tale of four, twelve year old, small town boys who walk 20 miles on train tracks to see the body of a dead boy in the woods. It came to theaters when I was twelve years old myself. It was especially popular among twelve year old girls for its casting: Will Wheaton as the thoughtful future writer boy, River Phoenix as the misunderstood hoodlum with a heart of gold, Corey Feldman as the war obsessed son of a crazy WWII vet and Jerry O’Connell as the wimpy, fat kid who knows the location of the dead body. A young, hot, Keifer Sutherland is their nemesis, and Richard Dreyfuss’s gravelly voice narrates the thing. The issues these boys were struggling with were far beyond anything I would ever know, but I still cried with them, and there is enough suspense...