Skins or Why I Stopped Watching 90210

So I vowed to give 90210 another chance a few weeks ago, because it was created by Rob Thomas (Veronica Mars) and because I adore Tristan Wilds from The Wire and want to see him succeed in his next venture. However, I ended up turning off the TV only 20 minutes into the second episode. Not because it was bad — though it was, but because the lead characters played by Shenae Grimes, Jessica Stroup, and AnnaLynne McCord (who I loved in Nip/Tuck) are simply too thin to bear watching. Here’s the thing. I was as thin as Shannon Doherty and Jennie Garth from the original series in high school. No, let me correct myself. I should say that I was as thin as Brenda and Kelly in high school, because it was possible to be as thin as they were without starving yourself. I don’t believe that the new series female regulars are actually anorexic. But I am certain that they are starving themselves and over-exercising to look the way that they do. They probably feel that being extremely thin is the price that girls must pay to be on TV. However, if they’re meant to represent the high school ideal, then they are sending the wrong message to girls across America as we speak: that it is more important to be underweight than to be smart, that extreme thinness attracts both boys and popularity. And though I tend not judge TV — it is after all, TV. I cannot condone that message. And If I were a parent of impressionable girls, I might allow them to watch The Wire, but I wouldn’t allow them to watch this. What strikes me as especially interesting about this situation is that my new favorite high...

5 Things You Wish You Didn’t Know About the New 90210

As learned during an ill-advised reading of an EW article: 1. The good girl role, currently being played by scarily toothpickish Shenae Grimes (Degrassi: The Next Generation) was originally offered to Hillary Duff. 2. Most of the character were created by Rob Thomas (Veronica Mars), who after collecting his paycheck from the devil, dumped this project, in order to revive Cupid at ABC. No, I didn’t feel that show needed to be revived either. 3. Actors have been complaining about frequent script rewrites due to studio (the ailing CW and CBS Productions) interference. 4. Ian Ziering has supposedly expressed interest in coming back to the show, but the showrunners won’t let him, because they say nobody really wants to see Steve again. They are probably right. Ian Ziering, bless his little heart, positively reeks of desperation these day. Not a good look. 5. As to whether the father of Kelly Taylor’s (Jennie Garth) 4-year-old son is Dylan (Luke Perry) or Brandon (Jason Priestly) — according to Garth, “I have a feeling whichever guy shows up on the show first, that’s who the father will be.” High standards. Thy name is...