XXX Live Nude Sustainable Housing! [A Tall Glass of Shame] Sep01

Share This

XXX Live Nude Sustainable Housing! [A Tall Glass of Shame]

Ok, so I had to get your attention somehow! I admit the subject of sustainable housing isn’t very sexy, for many it just conjures images of dirty hippies and leftist lobbyists screaming from the corner while everyone ignores them. Today I want you to just sit back, close your eyes and imagine a big beautiful house that YOU own. (Note: You can make it as sexy and amazing as you want.) Now imagine that not only can you afford it in todays terrible market, but it also helps the planet by utilizing unconventional methods and materials to make it. Oh lord I lost you again didn’t I?

Ok folks, I know what you are thinking, my column is usually pointing my radar gun on some crazy pop culture mess, but not this week. Let me back track and tell you about why I decided this week not to focus on another Snooki nip slip or other crazy pop culture moment. I recently watched a documentary that is from 2007 titled Garbage Warrior that stopped me in my tracks. The film really made me see that the term “sustainable housing” isn’t just another empty promise set of words like Santa Claus, The Tooth Fairy, Free Lunch or even Trustworthy Politician. Sustainable Housing is possible today… Anywhere on this planet… Even that empty urban lot next to your work downtown. Sadly, due to the lack of value placed on it, the bureaucracy and red tape of today’s regulatory system won’t allow it to happen. For Michael Reynolds, the man in the documentary, it is like sitting next to a giant pile of Christmas presents you want to hand out and being told by our legal system that those gifts are not allowed to be touched right now. They may never be.

Michael Reynolds is a radical architect-engineer who has been designing and building eco-friendly homes out of self sustaining and disposable materials for the last 30 years. Although to some it seems crazy or downright ugly in some instances, he has some interesting practices that could make modern living much cheaper. His idea of “Earthship Biotecture” started very modest, but through experimentation and a playful mind has grown into something I can really see being a viable building option that could change how we treat our planet. As his style of building is so site specific and works with the climate and location it is on, his set of ideas and the knowledge he and his team have compiled could be applied almost anywhere on the globe. Since our system hasn’t afforded him the ability to experiment, he has taken most of his work elsewhere, aiding victims in Asia from the great tsunamis of the last few years as well as coming up with solutions for poverty stricken areas around the world.

He brings up something, towards the beginning of the film, that I had never really thought of before: We have testing in place for everything in our lives from the diapers we wrap our kids in, to the food we eat, to the toothbrush in our mouth but we have absolutely no system in place for testing new methods and types of housing. Now while we test products and different materials that go into housing, we have never within our modern society come up with legal loopholes to allow for experimentation within the system. Our strict building guidelines are based on what we think should be the norm for many reasons, especially safety of inhabitants, but what if this whole time we are just building ourselves into a smaller and smaller box that one day suffocates us? What do we do when the oil supply gets so expensive it is no longer feasible to use, or worse just dries up? How do we propose to get the materials we base those standards and guidelines on to and from projects, and what if there are cheaper and better alternatives we have been ignoring all along? Nobody wants to wake up and realize they just laid the last brick in their personal jail cell.

Regardless of whether his methods will change the world, or even change your mind, the documentary is really interesting and some of the homes have to be seen to be believed. His method of design reminds me of a crazy trash picking Frank Lloyd Wright. Site specific, open plans, utilizing the sun as a means of light and heat where applicable, these are all things FLW worked into every space he ever built.

You can watch the film in its entirety here, or get it where available on Netflix.

One of the ingredients to most of Michael Reynolds’ homes is Cob. Cob is a mixture of clay, sand, straw, water, and dirt that is mixed together into a mushy pulp, formed into walls or architectural elements and left to dry. The greatest thing about it is that with the thickness of Cob walls being almost 24 inches thick, it allows for great insulation in any climate no matter how harsh the summer or winter is. The material can last for generations. Some European Cob cottages are still in use today having been first built in the 1800′s.

Here is an interesting very short film about Cob cottages called Off The Treadmill

An Example of the modern tiny Cob home:

Now I know none of you are about to go pick up a shovel and some mud and start living the dream these people have set forth, but some of these practices could have interesting far reaching effects. I look forward to the future and hope with time that more and more people start paying attention to sustainable means for not just housing, but also our food and textiles. The world can always do without the need to ship everything here there and back just so Suzy can have an ugly rayon dress for 3 dollars. I am a realist here, changing the system is difficult and will not happen overnight. I also know that no matter what, our dependence on oil and massive waste and consumption in the modern age will not go away. The best way we can make change is to be aware of what alternatives we have and to vote with our wallets.

Now, so that you don’t think I’ve lost my mind as well as my pop culture jag I give you a little gift:

RoboGeisha

Yes it is a real film, and yes it is available on Netflix streaming… you all are welcome.

If you liked this post, please do us the further boon of Liking the Fierce and Nerdy page on FaceBook. Also, we’re giving great stream on Twitter, so do give us follow.