Thai Time [Fierce Foodie]

Spring is my favorite time of year, and my favorite soup is perfect for the varying temperatures of the season. Tom kha gai is a Thai soup made from coconut milk, lemongrass, fresh ginger, juice of a lime, chile paste, basil and cilantro. It is hot and sweet and lemony and limey. Just right for spring in the Northeast, when it’s cold and rainy one day and climbing up to 80 the next. The mushrooms should be fresh and not canned, whatever kind you use, and thrown in at the last minute to preserve freshness. Grocery store white button mushrooms are just fine. If you want to get fancy and make sure your chicken is nice and tender, you can pound it flat between pieces of wax paper and then submit it to a process called “velveting.” The point of velveting is to keep the meat soft and juicy. The chicken breast is coated in a mixture of egg white and cornstarch, rice wine or dry sherry and salt, marinated for up to 30 minutes, and then cooked very briefly in hot oil until the color turns to white. It’s a process from Chinese cooking that prevents chicken breast from turning into dry, mealy chunks in the cooking liquid. If you use this process to cook the chicken, add it at the end with the mushrooms. Tom Kha Gai Adapted from myrecipes.com Ingredients 1 can (14 oz.) reduced fat coconut milk 1 can (14 oz.) reduced-sodium chicken broth 6 quarter-size slices fresh ginger 1 stalk fresh lemongrass, cut in 1-in. pieces 1 pound boned, skinned chicken breast, cut into 1-inch chunks 1 cup sliced mushrooms 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice 1 tablespoon Thai or Vietnamese fish sauce (nuoc mam or nam pla) 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon Thai...

Miracle Whip vs. Hellmann’s Mayonnaise, Which Team are You On? [Kicking Back with Jersey Joe] Nov04

Miracle Whip vs. Hellmann’s Mayonnaise, Which Team are You On? [Kicking Back with Jersey Joe]...

How do you like your potato salad?  What’s your favorite condiment on a chicken sandwich?  Growing up in Western Pennsylvania, I was raised on Miracle Whip.  A recent conversation with friends seemed to inform me that I was brought up missing out on pure mayonnaise.  So, what’s the difference and which is best? Mayonnaise is condiment sauce made up of oil, egg yolk, vinegar or lemon juice. Early accounts say that as long as there has been olive oil, there has been some form of mayonnaise.  Another account says it was discovered accidentally by a British woman in 1459, who was trying to create a custard. However it happened, it appears the French first exported it into their country after defeating the British in a port battle in 1756.  The name was derived from the word moyeu, which is French for egg.  Another account says it may have finally earned the official name mayonnaise after Charles de Lorraine, duke of Mayenne, who finished his chicken dinner with the sauce on the side before being defeated in a major battle. While the are various reports of its creation overseas, the product’s roots in the United States is much more clear. In the US, mayonnaise was first sold in New York City’s Upper West Side. In 1905, the first ready made mayo was on sale at Richard Hellmann’s deli on Columbus Avenue. After being a local success, it was mass marked 7 years later and introduced as Hellmann’s Blue Ribbon Mayonnaise. At the same time on the West Coast, Best Foods created their own version of mayonnaise which became very popular on their side of the country.  Best Foods eventually bought the Hellmann’s company in the early 1930’s, but the demand was so high for both products...

Jaw Dropping Natural Disasters Caught on Camera [Kicking Back with Jersey Joe] Oct21

Jaw Dropping Natural Disasters Caught on Camera [Kicking Back with Jersey Joe]...

It’s certainly been a rocky couple of years on planet earth.  Every continent has experienced at least one (if not more) major disaster(s).  With all the cameras and technology out there, the power of Mother Nature has been caught on tape. And based on these jaw dropping videos I found… she’s one mad mother! I don’t remember seeing many of these videos on the national news broadcasts.  Usually, after a few days, they move onto another topic and these images are left to live to the web.  With the technological age we live in, we are able to beam images of a natural disaster seconds after they happen.  When an area is struck particularly hard, it can take time for the infrastructure to be repaired and lives to be rebuilt, before these have a chance to be seen. On March 11, 2011 Japan was the epicenter of a massive 9.0 earthquake. Almost every citizen in this densely populated country had their cameras on at the time and now we can all relive those horrifying 60 seconds. Much of the rocking, rolling, and destruction was captured on everything from security cameras to cell phones.  But, the massive tsunami that followed brought us some of the most shocking footage of all. Check out this video from a car’s dashboard camera of the quake and the car suddenly being engulfed and floating in the wave! Take a close look – there are people still inside many of those cars! Here’s more rare earthquake footage.  A guy is walking in the park as the earthquake happens and he captures the ground moving and cracking apart! So, what would a massive earthquake look like inside a casino?  Check out this video from the Chilean earthquake in 2010. Casinos don’t miss...