What Console Makers Can Learn from Apple [Game On}

With Nintendo recently posting some horrible losses, a lot of which can be attributed to the rise in iOS gaming popularity, it occurs to me that if Apple really does plan on making a foray into gaming, there are some things that Nitntendo, Sony, and Microsoft can do to prepare for this by learning from Apple’s past successes.  Things like… Have an Ecosystem (Or Join One) Apple makes beautiful devices.  Simple, elegant, and highly functional. However, pristine as the iPad might be, it wouldn’t be very drool worthy if not for the variety of content available on it. I’m directing this point particularly toward Nintendo. For years they’ve hamstrung themselves with lackluster online experiences and clunky marketplace offerings. Making matters worse is that the bulk of their content consists of rehashed first party titles from years past that we’ve already purchased on another system Microsoft and Sony had a little more foresight here.  Both offer the ability to purchase movies, music, and games.  The meteoric rise of indie games is at least partially thanks to Microsoft’s outstanding support of 3rd party developers on its system. The difference between Apple and Nintendo is that while they’re similar in their pursuit of end-to-end integration, Apple’s model is more adept at leveraging the creativity of self-starters with its lush support of iOS development. Simplicity is the Ultimate Sophistication While motion controls were novel at their debut, Sony and Nintendo’s offerings looked archaic next to Microsoft’s Kinect. It had largely the same capabilities, but the package was more enticing without multiple accessories, batteries, and add-ons being required to make the experience fun. The same can be said of game design to a degree. Angry Birds is an astoundingly simple premise — slingshot birds to eliminate pigs. Five words. Done. In an age where...